A guide to Greek life at UT

Areeba Shah, Community Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






image_pdfimage_print

For some college students, being involved in Greek Life is a major part of their identities. Others wonder what going Greek really means.

For third-year political science and German major, Alex DiBell, it means making lifelong friendships, serving the community and exceeding academically.

“I could literally go on for hours as to how the fraternities have benefited me and impacted me not in just my college experience but my personal development as well,” DiBell said.

Dibell is the president of the Inter-Fraternity Council and has been a member of Phi Gamma Delta, aka FIJI, since his freshman year.

Through FIJI, DiBell has participated in service events like Rockethon and Relay for Life. The fraternity also hosts its own philanthropy dinners raising money for the Children’s Miracle Network.

“We cherish brotherhood and try to invite as many people into that brotherhood,” DiBell said.

FIJI uses its five core values: friendship, knowledge, service, morality and excellence to make a greater impact on the Toledo community.

When it comes to recruitment, DiBell advices individuals to shift their focus from impressing fraternity members to instead focus on being themselves.

“There is a fraternity that is right for you but don’t try to sell yourself as something you’re not,” DiBell said. “There is a place for everybody.”

With 30 organizations available to University of Toledo students, individuals have the opportunity to explore fraternities and sororities whose goals and values align best with theirs.

“Being Greek may not be for everyone but you wouldn’t know if it’s for you or not if you don’t try,” third-year psychology major Rachel Whitman said.

Whitman has been a part of Delta Pi Epsilon for two years.

“I fell in love with the sisterhood, the service and their dedication to their philanthropy,” Whitman said.

Whitman said Delta Pi hosts different events helping members bond and improve themselves through serving the campus.

Although the recruitment process can be overwhelming at times, according to Whitman, it helps potential members find a chapter they can call their home.

“Each sorority has its own personality. What I love about ours is that we’re very inclusive,” Whitman said.

She added they don’t care about physical characteristics or different opinions. You are valued for being a person.

Third-year biology pre-med major Chloe Wagenhauser has been a member of Chi Omega for a year now and believes it has allowed her to form new bonds and get more involved in the university.

“I’ve just a met a ton of girls who support me in whatever I do and if there’s anything going on in my life or if I need someone there, I know I have like 60 other girls who would be right there to help me if I ever needed anything,” Wagenhauser said.

She says Chi Omega is a diverse group of women who are all caring, funny and well-rounded individuals.

“You see all these movies with people who party who are in Greek Life and it’s so much more than that,” Wagenhauser said.

Going Greek is not necessarily about joining social organizations. There are also professional and service fraternities available at UT.

P4 pharmacy major Ami Mehta is a part of the professional pharmacy fraternity, Lambda Kappa Sigma, which aims to provide women with lifelong opportunities in pharmacy through personal growth and professional development.

“I felt like I made friends that were really true and still talk to them. They became like mentors as well,” Mehta said.

Mehta said she seeks advice from her other friends since they are all on the same pathway.

“Greek Life often carries a lot of stigmas and stereotypes and I would just encourage people that are hesitant or confused about Greek Life to come out and give Greek Life a chance,” DiBell said.
Students interested in learning about what different fraternities and sororities have to offer can visit OrgSync.

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

Serving the University of Toledo community since 1919.
A guide to Greek life at UT